Only one day left!

Artwork Experiments, Exhibition
Finding ways to use up the leftover ink from the workshop

Finding ways to use up the leftover ink from the workshop

Absorbent Ho Sho paper left overnight in inky water after the workshop so that the colour wicks up the paper.

Absorbent Ho Sho paper left overnight in inky water after the workshop so that the colour wicks up the paper.

Trying various ways of using up leftover ink from the workshop on Wednesday

Trying various ways of using up leftover ink from the workshop on Wednesday

Trying different ways of using up the ink that was left at the end of the workshop yesterday.

Trying different ways of using up the ink that was left at the end of the workshop yesterday.

I have thoroughly enjoyed my stay here at the Basement Gallery and feel really quite sad that this is my penultimate day. This morning I gave an artist talk – which turned into more of a conversation between friends so my nervousness quickly faded away 🙂 I pulled out all my materials, pens, brushes, papers, inks, display folders, workbooks and samples from the workshop yesterday so my work desk in the gallery looked like a bomb had gone off! It didn’t take too long to clear up afterwards and it was totally worth it. It’s always rewarding to talk to people who understand when I get excited about leaving paper overnight in the jar of used water loaded with ink to see what I get the following day.

The exhibition is open from 10am to 4pm 24 November so if you haven’t visited yet and would like to then this is your last chance!

The results from leaving Japanese paper in inky water overnight and then laid flat to dry.

The results from leaving Japanese paper in inky water overnight and then laid flat to dry.

Rolled Japanese paper sitting in inky water left at the end of the workshop. This was given an occasional "swirl" and then left overnight before being laid flat to dry.

Rolled Japanese paper sitting in inky water left at the end of the workshop. This was given an occasional “swirl” and then left overnight before being laid flat to dry.

 

A Solo Exhibition – Woo Hoo!

Exhibition, Uncategorized

Sometimes everything comes together to create an opportunity you just cannot pass up. That’s how come I am having a solo exhibition next week….

A friend noticed a Facebook post by The Basement Gallery asking for emerging artists who might be interested in holding an exhibition in their new premises (241 Hay Street, Subiaco) to attend an open viewing time. We both went along to find out more on behalf of a newly formed group that may be interested in exhibiting together – possibly next year. The gallery and associated Pop Creative graphics design are run by volunteers (mostly uni students) to gain work experience in the arts. During our discussions with the volunteer gallery curator we learned that there was a vacancy in November. We knew the group would not be ready by then (we haven’t even had our first meeting yet!) and I realised I already had enough work with a reef theme to fill the space. I have lots of pen and ink drawings, some collages and several textile pieces – all inspired by coral reefs and their inhabitants. I submitted the application and paid the hire fee so I will be exhibiting Mon 13 Nov to Fri 17 Nov and Mon 20 Nov to Fri 24 Nov (open weekdays only 10-4, closed weekends).

This is the invite to my first solo exhibition “Reef – A Fine Line

The invitation to my solo exhibition "Reef - A Fine Line" at the Basement Gallery, 241 Hay St, Subiaco, Western Australia.

The invitation to my solo exhibition “Reef – A Fine Line” at the Basement Gallery, 241 Hay St, Subiaco, Western Australia.

Inspiration has struck! :)

Artwork by Liz, Artwork In-Progress, Uncategorized

Inspiration comes from the strangest of places. With all the printing I’ve been doing lately there have been quite a few painted baby wipes created by the clean up process. They are quite colourful and semi transparent so there were some interesting effects when I layered them (another thing worth collecting!).

The inspiration for these works were the semi-transparent clean-up baby-wipes with blue paint on them.

The 6″ canvas’s in progress. I’m debating the colour of the embellishments but I like the backgrounds I have created by layering clean up cloths (baby wipes)

They are a non-woven fabric similar to dressmakers interfacing so they can be stitched. They tear easily in one direction only. I have used those to make a background for the Fibres West donation pieces, on which I will stitch some embellishment in red. I haven’t yet decided which red to use – a more muted Indian Oxide type red to match the muted blue, or a bright “popping” Cadmium Scarlet. I’m going to paint the ribbon and the cardboard circles and then stitch them in place. I am thinking about the finishing process while I do all this.

Painted Papers and Dried Paint

Artwork by Liz, Artwork Experiments, Uncategorized

Some more painted paper results. Various papers scrunched and painted with dilute acrylics (Yellow Oxide and Cadmium Scarlet).

Painted paper experiments for collage. Various papers: brown Kraft, white 80gsm and 70gsm bond, light engineering drawing, bank layout, tissue, light cartridge and handmade Chinese. All chosen because they were acid free. January 2015

Painted paper experiments for collage. Various papers: brown Kraft, white 80gsm and 70gsm bond, light engineering drawing, bank layout, tissue, light cartridge and handmade Chinese. All chosen because they were acid free. January 2015

The detail shot is Chinese handmade paper which was laid over some plastic which had some interesting-looking dried paint on it.

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I deliberately chose a colour from the opposite side of the colour wheel so that the paint marks would show up clearly if they transferred. So now I’m creating a stash of plastic with interesting dried paint on it as well! 🙂

 

 

 

 

Collagraph plate experiments – thin card + shellac

Artwork by Liz, Artwork Experiments, Uncategorized

How I made the collagraph plate

I have finished weaving paper (it took me ages – much longer than I anticipated!) to make another collagraph plate.

Woven paper collagraph coated with Shellac. I like the effect - looks almost like bamboo.

Woven paper collagraph coated with Shellac. I like the effect – looks almost like bamboo.

I used Selly’s Exterior Aquadhere PVA to glue the finished weaving to a piece of thicker card previously sealed with WestArt Crystal Clear spray varnish (but I forgot about that when I glued the paper weaving on).

Once the glue was dry I sealed both sides with Shellac. I think I did about 6 coats on the weaving because that is going to get a lot of use, and I did 2 on the back because I realised that it wasn’t soaking in as I had previously sealed the thick card with WestArt Crystal Clear varnish. So that indicates to me that the Crystal Clear may be a good enough water-proofing agent by itself.

The back of the woven paper collagraph coated with Shellac. I like the texture.

The back of the woven paper collagraph coated with Shellac. I like the texture.

A detail of the woven paper collagraph plate. I like the inclusion of the printed lines from the scrap paper.

A detail of the woven paper collagraph plate. I like the inclusion of the printed lines from the scrap paper.

I really like the appearance (and the feel) of the paper sealed with Shellac and will experiment more with this on different papers/fabrics/threads. I’m also wondering what Shellac would look like over different colours of paper/painted paper. Tissue paper and brown paper could look very interesting.

And I still like the broken lines that look like code too 🙂

Printing – and overprinting

Uncategorized

For my second attempt I took some of the prints from my first session and added a second layer. I’m not so keen on the multi-coloured patchwork effect which seems to be the predominant way to use the Gelli plate as I find them very busy in general. Some people seem to carry this off with aplomb but I’m sure my efforts will look more like “a bomb” (has gone off) than “aplomb”.

This print has too much contrast for my liking so I decided to try overprinting it.

This print has too much contrast for my liking so I decided to try overprinting it.

I want to see if I can produce simple, well-composed images within the confines of the Gelli plate with only a few pulls (say up to 5) which then need minimal “tweaking” to finalise them. I’m envisioning a few well-placed stitches, collaged paper scraps or brush strokes to accentuate focal points will be all that is required to complete them.

I see the patchwork happening when I cut up the less satisfying prints to create collages.

I created a printing plate from printing foam by pushing the blunt end of a skewer into it to create an all over dots pattern. I used this in 2 ways – to put ink (acrylic paint) onto the Gelli Plate – and as an indirect printing plate by taking paint off of the Gelli Plate.

I used a bamboo skewer to push holes into some polystyrene foam. The foam was used to remove paint from the printing plate. This print is from the printing plate. The print from the foam isn't shown.

I used a bamboo skewer to push holes into some polystyrene foam. The foam was used to remove paint from the printing plate. This print is from the printing plate. The print from the foam isn’t shown.

The second photo has no white because the ink was applied to the Gelli plate first and then the foam printing plate was used to remove paint from the Gelli plate. Where there is contact some paint is removed (giving a lighter colour) and where there is no contact the paint is unchanged (and therefore darker). A paper print pulled from this has no white showing.

This is a previous print which had a lot of contrast (very white circles on a dark blue background) overprinted with the ghost (second pull without adding more ink) image of another print

This is a previous print which had a lot of contrast (very white circles on a dark blue background) overprinted with the ghost (second pull without adding more ink) image of another print.

The third photo shows a previous print which had a lot of contrast (very white circles on a dark blue background) overprinted with the ghost (second pull without adding more ink) image of the print in the second photo.

The layering of images and the density of the ink will take me some time to master I think – my vision of “simple, well-composed images within the confines of the Gelli plate with only a few pulls (say up to 5) which then need minimal “tweaking” to finalise them” could be a long time coming 🙂

Finished collages!

Uncategorized
Close up of collage, linocut print and mixed media on acid free 600gsm cardboard. April 2015

Close up of collage, linocut print and mixed media on acid free 600gsm cardboard. April 2015

This is a detail shot of my latest completed collage (the 7th I think). I used some of the papers I have been painting over the last few weeks (3 out of 100’s – grin). I had carved a couple of lino-cuts just before Christmas and used one of them for this piece. I printed the lino cut with Derivan Block Ink and later worked into the piece with Derwent coloured pencil, Pitt Indian Ink Artist pen and Rembrandt soft pastel. I will give it a few coats of fixative because of the pastel and pencil before storing it. This series of collages are all 20cm W by 30cm H.

On the downward slope…

Uncategorized
Chinese paper placed on slight slope, dilute blue paint dribbled along top edge. Whilst still wet the paper was turned 180 degrees and dilute red paint dribbled from the opposite edge. This is the front view (allowed to dry on plastic).

Chinese paper placed on slight slope, dilute blue paint dribbled along top edge. Whilst still wet the paper was turned 180 degrees and dilute red paint dribbled from the opposite edge. This is the front view (allowed to dry on plastic).

This is Chinese paper which is sold by Jacksons Art Supplies. The only bit I can read on the label says “Xue Shan” which I presume to be the company which makes it. The paper is very absorbent, has a shiny side and a dull side and has a vague stripe running through it (guidelines for their calligraphy?). I placed a piece on plastic on a slight slope. I dampened the paper and put very dilute blue paint along the top edge and watched it slowly make it’s way down the slope. Once this was dry I turned the bottom edge to the top and did the same with red. I really like the blending and the following of creases, I also like the way the paint went around air bubbles. The top photo shows the front (the side I painted) and

Chinese paper placed on slight slope, dilute blue paint dribbled along top edge. Whilst still wet the paper was turned 180 degrees and dilute red paint dribbled from the opposite edge. This is the back (allowed to dry on plastic).

Chinese paper placed on slight slope, dilute blue paint dribbled along top edge. Whilst still wet the paper was turned 180 degrees and dilute red paint dribbled from the opposite edge. This is the back (allowed to dry on plastic).

the lower photo shows the back. I think I actually like the back better.

 

Painted Papers – Overpainting

Uncategorized

Recently I picked out some of the less interesting previously painted papers and added more paint as well as creating some new papers. This photo shows all the papers painted that day.

Some papers were overpainted and some new papers were created.

Some papers were overpainted and some new papers were created.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This photo shows 4 uninteresting papers chosen for overpainting.

These 4 papers were chosen for overpainting with Turners Yellow. The papers at the top and on the right also had an orangey-red added.

These 4 papers were chosen for overpainting with Turners Yellow. The papers at the top and on the right also had an orangey-red added.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is the result of overpainting the uninteresting papers. They are starting to become  a lot more interesting now.

These are the same papers overpainted with Turners Yellow. The papers at the top and on the right also had an orangey-red added. Now they are starting to become interesting.

These are the same papers overpainted with Turners Yellow. The papers at the top and on the right also had an orangey-red added. Now they are starting to become interesting.

Painted Papers – Earthy, Brown, Rust, Terracotta

Uncategorized
Various papers scrunched to make them more absorbent and create texture, and then painted with diluted acrylic paints.

Various papers scrunched to make them more absorbent and create texture, and then painted with diluted acrylic paints.

There is a tube of Burnt Umber that needs using too so after using it as is, I had a go at some other earthy colours by adding orange to the Burnt Umber. I need to create some more blues and purples to go with these too.