Girt by Sea

Exhibition

I visited the wonderful exhibition “Girt by Sea” on Sunday afternoon. This is an art (as opposed to documentary) exhibition of 100 large aerial photographs taken by Tony Hewitt and Denis Glennon of the coastline of Australia. It is a “must see” exhibition while it is on here in Perth. The exhibition is on from 25 September to 13 October at Central Park, 152-158 St Georges Terrace, Perth WA 6000. Open times are 10am to 5.30pm weekdays and 10-4 on Saturday 13th (the last day!)

Tony and Dennis were sponsored by Canon for this project which involved hiring a light aircraft and 2 pilots to circumnavigate the coast of Australia to experience and bring new meaning to the words “Girt by Sea” from our national anthem.

Run, don’t walk to this exhibition – you will not be disappointed! Prints are for sale and there is also a beautifully presented book available. I am planning on visiting it again if possible sometime during this next week.

 

 

The finished embroidery on the blue felt with silk inclusions. I was aiming for a coral reef look but the "barnacles" ended up looking more like flowers - mainly because I added an orange centre to them I think. I'm still pleased with the final result though. 8 x 7.5 cm

WAFTA Artist in Residence 2018

Artist in Residence

WAFTA Artist in Residence 2018 – Again!

Well, I am stunned and amazed! The selection panel looked favourably on my application to be a WAFTA Artist in Residence at The Shopfront at North Metro TAFE, 149 Beaufort Street, Perth, Western Australia for a second year in succession. There are 3 of us this year, last year there were 2. Apparently our applications all relate to wearable art and body adornment so we should get on like a house on fire πŸ™‚ These are the promotional posters for each of us.

The Shopfront Gallery is open 10-4 on weekdays only (closed weekends). Visitors welcome. We are giving artist talks on Thursdays.

The AIR last year was a cathartic experience for me.Β  I finished the residency making experimental work that was completely different to my usual style. It was big for a start πŸ™‚

This year I have had less time to think and prepare beforehand because I was ill. In my application I said that I am particularly interested in the combination of hard/soft materials, and ways of creating articulated joints to enable drape or change in direction. I have made quite a few brooches over the past year and I was thinking more about necklaces when I was referring to drape and articulated joints.

 

Exhibition by Artonomy: 14 Degrees of Separation

Exhibition
"Untitled/2017" by Beverley Iles. Work number 3 in the exhibition "Artonomy: 14 Degrees of Separation" at Ellenbrook Gallery, 4 May - 31 May, 2018.

“Untitled/2017” by Beverley Iles. Work number 3 in the exhibition “Artonomy: 14 Degrees of Separation” at Ellenbrook Gallery, 4 May – 31 May, 2018.

Participating artists are: Angela Leaney, Beverley Iles, Criss Sullivan, Cynthia Payne, Denise Pepper, Gabrielle Hart, Georgina Moss, Gregor Hart, Jenelle Melville, Lyn Bindley, Peter Dailey, Tami Esancy, Tracey Hart, and Vernon Durling.

When I first entered this exhibition, I was confused – there were works with obvious links to other works on view, but they were hung metres apart. I wondered why they would do that? I walked across the gallery to the one I felt was related – trying to understand why what seemed to be disparate work was hung together, and related works apart. Every work is untitled, and I needed some clues to the layout logic. Another circuit – still no leads. The floor sheet shows that works are arranged in 4 sets and in numerical order. OK then – I’ll start with the first work of the first set and go from there. Work 1 features a telephone, which I interpreted as opening the lines of communication and the second work seemed to validate this with lines of readable text accompanying 2 drawings. This was followed by a textile book with embroidered lines and shapes reminiscent of the 2 drawings. The last work in this set is an eye-catching photographic print of emu feathers. Once my confusion reduced I realised that there are some exciting, well-executed works in this exhibition.

It was interesting to work through each of the first 3 sets chronologically, analysing each work to find what had been extracted from the previous work, interpreted and passed along through the respondent work. It was fun to work out β€œhow to get there from here” as it were. But I found myself wanting to see the respondent works elaborated or extended. This need was partially met by Set 4. Six of the 14 artists had produced additional work which could easily be the start of a large body of work. As a viewer I found myself thinking that maybe one set of the Chinese Whispers style exercise with perhaps 3-5 works from each artist taking one aspect of the exercise further would have been more satisfying. But that probably wasn’t the goal for the group. The Artology group has successfully shown the work resulting from coordinated regular group meetings to exchange ideas and discuss current projects.

Artonomy: 14 Degrees of Separation is on now at Ellenbrook Art Gallery, 34 Main St, Ellenbrook 6069. The exhibition runs from 5-30 May 2018 (Open Wed-Fri 10am-2pm, Sat & Sun 1-5pm)

 

The finished embroidery on the blue felt with silk inclusions. I was aiming for a coral reef look but the "barnacles" ended up looking more like flowers - mainly because I added an orange centre to them I think. I'm still pleased with the final result though. 8 x 7.5 cm

Blue Brooch in Progress

Artwork by Liz, Artwork In-Progress

The photos below show the various stages of creating a felt brooch. Except that I forgot to take a photo of the wool fibres with the silk bits included prior to felting. I will get better at this “in-progress” lark – I am certainly getting lots of practice πŸ™‚

I made a “sort of” new year resolution to use what I have in my various stashes (yes, I have more than one stash – one of the penalties perks of working with mixed media). I have quite a lot of embroidery threads – some purchased, some gifted, some hand dyed by me or friends. Embroidery threads tend to tangle and knot and this tendency can be tamed by winding onto bobbins. There were quite a few in the stash that I had been reluctant to use because they were “untamed” and I spent quite a bit of time getting them under control so that I would at least consider using them. This was an enjoyable task sparking lots of ideas as I wound, and wound, and wound.

This blue brooch is now almost finished – it just requires another piece of felt to cover the thread ends and a brooch pin to be stitched to the back for it to be wearable.

A picture of embroidery threads being organised. Some wound onto bobbins so that they are easier to use.

Chaos tamed. Winding threads onto bobbins so that I actually use them. When they are not wound onto bobbins I tend to avoid using them because I know they will get tangled and knotted.

The threads chosen for embellishing a felt brooch. Not all were used.

I forgot to take a picture of the un-embellished piece of felt with the threads that I chose so I took the photo once I had finished. You can probably tell that I didn’t use all of the threads.

Fully felted piece of felt ready for embellishment to make a unique brooch. 8 x 7.5 cm

Fully felted piece of felt ready for embellishment to make a unique brooch. 8 x 7.5 cm

The finished embroidery on the blue felt with silk inclusions. I was aiming for a coral reef look but the "barnacles" ended up looking more like flowers - mainly because I added an orange centre to them I think. I'm still pleased with the final result though. 8 x 7.5 cm

The finished embroidery on the blue felt with silk inclusions. I was aiming for a coral reef look but the “barnacles” ended up looking more like flowers – mainly because I added an orange centre to them I think. I’m still pleased with the final result though. 8 x 7.5 cm

WANT Exhibition at Ellenbrook Gallery, WA

Exhibition

Spanish Whispers IV by Katrina Virgona 2017 – included in WANT exhibition at Ellenbrook Gallery 2017

I spent quite some time today viewing “WAnt: contemporary jewellery from WA”, the current exhibition at Ellenbrook Gallery. For those of us that relish detail and art on a tiny scale, WANT is well worth a visit. All works are by members of The Jewellers and Metal Smiths Group of Australia – WA. I knew my friend Katrina Virgona had work in this exhibition (that was why I went in the first place) so I was expecting to see equally quirky and innovative works by other artists using unconventional materials. The work of Fatemeh Boroujeni, an artist that had caught my eye in the Made in Making Central TAFE exhibition 2015 (because she used brush bristles) also caught my eye in this. Overall, traditional precious metals and gems are well represented along with other unconventional materials such as silicon, silk, photographic paper, shakudo, polycarbonate, and paper. Techniques include metal-smithing and gem setting, but also crochet, felt, stitch and even charcoal drawing. The catalogue is well-produced with each artist having a 2-page spread comprising an artist statement and CV with a full page colour image on the facing page.

Katrina is also teaching a 1-day workshop “Felt and Textile Jewellery”Β  ($75) – for venue, other details and to book call Julie at The Gallery (08) 9297 9940. I have attended workshops by Katrina and know that this will be a fun filled day.

Details of exhibition: WANT, 14 March to 15 April 2018, Ellenbrook Gallery, 34 Main St, Ellenbrook WA 6069. Gallery hours: Closed Mon & Tue, 10-2 Wed-Fri, 1-5 Sat & Sun

Recycling a Little Blue Dress 2

Artwork In-Progress
The op-shop little blue dress unpicked so that I can attach strips of cotton fabric easily by machine. These 3 strips are to act as a guide so that I get all the patches straight.

The op-shop little blue dress unpicked so that I can attach strips of cotton fabric easily by machine. These 3 strips are to act as a guide so that I get all the patches straight.

This is as far as I got yesterday – the side seams and hem are unpicked and I have stitched on 3 strips of the shirt fabric to the back of the dress as a guide for getting the other patches straight. As I was doing that I thought “well, that’s mistake number 1 – I should have added to the length of the dress first”. Oh well, it might get some pleats added at the end, or the cuffs/collars of the shirts. We’ll see. I think I’ll carry on stitching patches on and worry about fit first (I’m thinking that all the stitching might pull it in a bit). If it fits then I’ll do something about the length – or not. πŸ™‚

The op-shop little blue dress unpicked so that I can attach strips of cotton fabric easily by machine. These 3 strips are to act as a guide so that I get all the patches straight.

The op-shop little blue dress unpicked so that I can attach strips of cotton fabric easily by machine. These 3 strips are to act as a guide so that I get all the patches straight.

Recycling a Little Blue Dress

Artwork In-Progress

I bought this little blue dress at an op-shop.

The dress I bought in an op-shop which fits nicely but is made from thin fabric and is a bit short. I'm going to try stitching pieces of other old clothing onto it to make a unique "arty" dress.

The dress I bought in an op-shop which fits nicely but is made from thin fabric and is a bit short. I’m going to try stitching pieces of other old clothing onto it to make a unique “arty” dress.

It fitted well but the fabric was so thin you could see through it, and it was a bit short. I decided it was a candidate for one of a series of altered clothing pieces that I have had in mind for a while (read that to mean that I have a stash of clothing bought from op-shops destined to be modified into something I would wear!). I am concerned about the amount of textile waste and pollution there is from all stages of the fashion industry – from manufacture right through to the post-consumer. So I “rescue” fabric and clothing whenever I can see a way I might use it. Anyway, this dress was so thin I decided it would make a good base to patch other fabric onto. It is also a very simple shape so I figured I could open the side seams to make it easier to stitch those patches on by machine. That way if the stitching caused some shrinkage (which I think is almost bound to happen) I can add a panel at the side seams. I can do the same thing at the shoulder if that also proves to be a problem.

Nagging doubts that have prevented me from starting this project to date are, 1. it will shrink so much it won’t fit, 2. that it will look really old-fashioned and almost “hippy”, 3. that I’m wasting time that could be better spent on something else, 4. that I won’t like it once I’ve done it, 5. that people will laugh at it, 6. that it isn’t really “art”, 7. that I could make some yardage in the same way and then cut out a dress using a pattern that I know will fit, 8. well, the list goes on – I could probably add 20 more negatives easily. πŸ™

Recycled blue shirts destined to be "married" to the Little Blue Dress to make a unique "arty" dress.

Recycled blue shirts destined to be “married” to the Little Blue Dress to make a unique “arty” dress.

So, I have decided to go ahead regardless. The best that can happen is that I end up with a dress that I like and the worst is that some fabric that probably would have ended up as landfill, will end up as landfill. I won’t have wasted my time because I know I will learn a lot along the way.