Pen and Ink Workshop Tuesday 21 November 2017

Exhibition, Uncategorized
Seaweed 005. Used as the promo image for Reef - A Fine Line solo exhibition

Pen and ink drawing titled Seaweed 005. Used as the promo image for Reef – A Fine Line solo exhibition

I will be running another pen and ink workshop at the basement gallery from 10am to 1pm on Tuesday 21 November 2017. To register go to their facebook event page or email them on gallery@colosoul.com.au The cost is $20, payable on the day.

We’ll look at the properties of different papers so that you know which papers I use, and why. I will demonstrate how I have drawn some of my images and talk about why I use particular pens. Then I will show you which acrylic inks I prefer, and talk about how they differ from other media such as watercolours, I will bring my brushes and pens for you to use, and will supply the inks for use in class so you can get a “feel” for them. Oxlades (at 49 Guthrie St, Osborne Park WA 6017) stock everything used in this class so if you decide you need some for yourself it would be worth visiting them.

The exhibition finishes on Friday 24 November. On Thursday 23rd I will be giving an artist talk starting at 10am (or just after) if you are interested in my inspiration, process or have any questions about the works.

Promotional Ideas

Exhibition, Uncategorized
The A3 posters and A6 flyers for Reef - A Fine Line created by Tegan of Pop Creative. Pop Creative work alongside The Basement Gallery and do the graphics design work associated with the exhibitions. This is the photo Lauren sent from her phone when they were delivered to the gallery.

The A3 posters and A6 flyers for Reef – A Fine Line created by Tegan of Pop Creative.

It has been very interesting working with the work experience volunteers at the Basement Gallery for Reef – A Fine Line. The A3 posters and A6 flyers for “Reef – A Fine Line” were created by Tegan Edwards the team leader of Pop Creative Graphic Design and Marketing Agency. Pop Creative work alongside The Basement Gallery and do the graphics design work associated with the exhibitions. This is the photo Lauren sent from her phone when they were delivered to the gallery before I went to pick them up. Click on the link to open a pdf version of the flyer – which you can print if you wish or email to a friend.

Liz Arnold A6 Flyer for Reef

The design of posters, invites and a digital cover page is included in the gallery hire, as is the making of a short video interview. Tegan has done a great job of the invites and posters I think. I’m just getting to know some of the people here. Tegan has finished her uni degree in human geography and planning, and followed that with studying integrated design. Tegan started working at the Colosoul Group towards the end of 2015 and at the moment is living life by “going with the flow” – seems to work – I’ve only ever seen her smiling. 🙂

Tegan Edwards is the Team Leader of POP Creative who designed the flyers and posters for Reef - A Fine Line

Tegan Edwards is the Team Leader of POP Creative who designed the flyers and posters for Reef – A Fine Line

 

 

A Solo Exhibition – Woo Hoo!

Exhibition, Uncategorized

Sometimes everything comes together to create an opportunity you just cannot pass up. That’s how come I am having a solo exhibition next week….

A friend noticed a Facebook post by The Basement Gallery asking for emerging artists who might be interested in holding an exhibition in their new premises (241 Hay Street, Subiaco) to attend an open viewing time. We both went along to find out more on behalf of a newly formed group that may be interested in exhibiting together – possibly next year. The gallery and associated Pop Creative graphics design are run by volunteers (mostly uni students) to gain work experience in the arts. During our discussions with the volunteer gallery curator we learned that there was a vacancy in November. We knew the group would not be ready by then (we haven’t even had our first meeting yet!) and I realised I already had enough work with a reef theme to fill the space. I have lots of pen and ink drawings, some collages and several textile pieces – all inspired by coral reefs and their inhabitants. I submitted the application and paid the hire fee so I will be exhibiting Mon 13 Nov to Fri 17 Nov and Mon 20 Nov to Fri 24 Nov (open weekdays only 10-4, closed weekends).

This is the invite to my first solo exhibition “Reef – A Fine Line

The invitation to my solo exhibition "Reef - A Fine Line" at the Basement Gallery, 241 Hay St, Subiaco, Western Australia.

The invitation to my solo exhibition “Reef – A Fine Line” at the Basement Gallery, 241 Hay St, Subiaco, Western Australia.

Artist in Residence – I intend to…

Artist in Residence, Uncategorized

As Artist in Residence I set out to:

  • Research ethnic body ornament and contemporary personal adornment created with textile techniques prior to the residency.
  • Design and create items of personal adornment such as necklaces, collars, bangles, rings, anklets, cuffs, brooches, ear-rings, and hair ornaments inspired by the research during the 2 week residency.
  • Have the research material and work in progress available for viewing by visitors and to present a lunchtime talk about the experience.

The brooches and hair barrettes in this photo are the type of work I was producing just prior to the residency. I knew adornment and/or jewellery was the general direction I wanted to go in for the future but these works were “safe” and “known” in terms of technique, materials, colour, and form. I needed to research, explore, and experiment in order to produce more exciting work.

Clockwise from top left: Hair barrette (machine & hand stitching), brooch (wrapped wire, stitching and crochet), hair barrette (hand embroidery), loom-woven beaded brooch backed with leather, experimental paper beads, brooch (wrapped wire with beads and embroidery), brooch (crochet and embroidery), felted brooch with embroidery.

Clockwise from top left: Hair barrette (machine & hand stitching), brooch (wrapped wire, stitching and crochet), hair barrette (hand embroidery), loom-woven beaded brooch backed with leather, experimental paper beads, brooch (wrapped wire with beads and embroidery), brooch (crochet and embroidery), felted brooch with embroidery.

 

Note: The residency was a collaborative affair between the West Australian Fibre and Textiles Association (WAFTA) and North Metro TAFE, Perth. It was held from 8-18 August 2017 at The Shopfront Gallery, 149 Beaufort Street, Perth.

 

Carders and Spindles for Spinning

Tools and Equipment, Uncategorized

I recently had reason to try and spin some donated Alpaca fleece. A friend of mine, Margaret Ford, gave me some carders for my birthday which was great – I was able to card all of the fleece. My FIL put the handles onto the

Edgar made a box for the carders (gifted to me by Margaret Ford) and the spindles he made for me fit in as well.

Edgar made a box for the carders (gifted to me by Margaret Ford) and the spindles he made for me fit in as well.

spiky “cards” for me and of course, once that was done they no longer fitted into the cardboard box they are shipped in. He wanted to make a wooden box for them for me so he went ahead and did that. He was part-way through doing that when I then did a workshop with Anne Williams through WAFTA where we learned to spin using a spindle. I explained to Edgar how these could be made from old paintbrush handles so he had a go. Then I found a paintbrush whilst out walking so he made a second one. Fortunately they both fit into the box with the carders – Isn’t that amazing? Serendipity at it’s best 🙂 So now I am fully equipped to clean, card, spin, skein, wind into balls and knit jumpers for the whole family – grin.

Edgar made a box for the carders (gifted to me by Margaret Ford) and the spindles he made for me fit in as well.

WooHoo!

Artwork by Liz, Artwork Finished, Exhibition, MELD, Uncategorized
Jolly Gerbera Series, drawing number 13 of 18 by Liz Arnold, July 2014

Jolly Gerbera Series, drawing number 13 of 18 by Liz Arnold, July 2014

Not one, Not two, but three Jolly Gerbera Series drawings were sold recently by the Artisan Store of Fremantle. I’ve been on a high ever since 🙂

There are still some drawings available for purchase. Numbers 1, 2, 5, 6, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18 are still for sale. I’ve just updated my Artwork Images to show all 18 of the Jolly Gerbera Series so you may like to check them out. They are for sale through the Artisan Store of Fremantle which specialises in high quality hand made art, jewellery and craft.

Jolly Gerbera Series, drawing number 07 of 18 by Liz Arnold, July 2014

Jolly Gerbera Series, drawing number 07 of 18 by Liz Arnold, July 2014

Jolly Gerbera Series, drawing number 04 of 18 by Liz Arnold, July 2014

Jolly Gerbera Series, drawing number 04 of 18 by Liz Arnold, July 2014

Work for Sale at The Artisan Store Fremantle

Artwork by Liz, Artwork Finished, Exhibition, MELD, Uncategorized
Jolly Gerbera Series, drawing number 01 of 18 by Liz Arnold, July 2014

Jolly Gerbera Series, drawing number 01 of 18 by Liz Arnold, July 2014

I’m EXCITED to have my work for sale in The Artisan Store Fremantle.

I have a glass cube and a glass shelf quite close to the window. Currently in the cube I have several hair barrettes and a bracelet made using Japanese seed beads. Also in the cube are 2 ceremonial bowls (made by recycling tea bags).

On the glass shelf I have a small easel with Jolly Gerbera #1 (of a series of 18 unique drawings) waiting for a new home. These are all framed by a professional framer here in Ellenbrook with a 20mm plain white frame so are ready to hang (ideal Christmas present for someone special). There is only room on the shelf for one at a time so if you see another one that you would like please contact The Artisan Store Fremantle. Once the one on display is sold they will put another one on the shelf. There are not many left now.

About the Jolly Gerbera Series

The Jolly Gerbera series was part of our MELD exhibition in 2014 and was very popular. My artist statement for the series was:

Gerberas. Jolly Gerberas. Their “essence” is vibrant, colourful, happy. Each one is a miniature natural mandala for meditation and contemplation with the power to transform my mood. These drawings attempt to preserve the “essence of Gerbera”. Pen drawing using archival pigmented ink on 185gsm smooth Arches watercolour paper. Coloured with archival pigmented acrylic inks. Sakura Pigma Micron black pen. Schmincke Aero colour Professional Finest Acrylic Ink and Art Spectrum Artists’ Pigmented Ink. Drawings were begun in March 2014 and series completed in July 2014. Each drawing 18cm square (30cm w x 30cm h including frame).

Keywords: flower, bright, circle, mandala, symmetry, gerbera, daisy, abstract, modern

Collagraphs

Artwork by Liz, Artwork Experiments, Uncategorized
Nine small collagraphs to experiment with texture by Liz Arnold, September 2015

Nine small collagraphs to experiment with texture by Liz Arnold, September 2015

The Collagraphs

Amongst other things, I made 9 small collagraphs (printing plates) (4.5 x 3 inches) over a period of a few weeks (quite a bit of drying time for various layers). They were experiments to create texture and to see how much depth variation gives a good print when using the press. The answer is “not much”. The plate at top right has circles punched from an old dilapidated paperback and crocheted cotton thread. The circles printed well but the crocheted cotton thread was probably a smidgen too thick as it trapped a lot of ink. I used (hogged?) the press at PAWA during the last Saturday Skill Sharing Session and the other members were really helpful in showing me how to set the press up, and how I should leave it when I’ve finished printing.

The Prints from the Collagraphs

Nine small collagraph prints (4.5 x 3 inches) by Liz Arnold. The lower middle print with the splodge was the first print - too much pressure on the press. September 2015.

Nine small collagraph prints (4.5 x 3 inches) by Liz Arnold. The lower middle print with the splodge was the first print – too much pressure on the press. September 2015.

The second photo shows the prints from those 9 plates. The very first print I did was the one with a big splodge! 🙁 I had too much pressure on the press – and possibly too much ink on the plate as well. The pressure was reduced for the remainder of the prints and I like how those came out.

Top row: 1/ cotton yarn, thin card and sand, 2/ watercolour paper strips, 3/ book page circles, the top of a bread mix bag, thin card strips. Second row: 1/ thin card and carborundum, 2/ eggshell (I put all sharp edges pointing down ie outside surface of egg up, and after I glued this the first time I rolled over it with a rolling pin and then applied another 2 layers of glue so there were no sharp bits sticking up), 3/ scrunched tissue paper. Third row: 1/ the top of a bread mix bag and thin card strips, 2/ crochet cotton, paperback page punches, 210gsm card rings, and thinner card strips, 3/ watercolour paper strips.

When I did these prints the plates had all had 8 coats of spray varnish. When I cleaned them they went a bit soft so I put them in the sun to dry for a couple of days to make sure I wasn’t trapping moisture inside and have since given them another 8 coats. Spray varnish doesn’t obscure detail but I don’t like the smell/effects on me even though I’ve been using a mask and spraying outside (staying downwind). I’m going to try brush on varnish which I was avoiding as I thought brush marks might give an unwanted texture. It’s probably just a question of getting the “knack”.

Learning to use Edinburgh Etch with Shana James

Artwork by Liz, Artwork Experiments, Uncategorized

About the etching class

For 3 Sundays in a row Shana James gave a beginners etching class hosted by PAWA (Printmakers Association of WA). We etched the copper plates with Edinburgh Etch solution.

This was my first copper plate etching - made by using hard ground and the Edinburgh Etch solution.

This was my first etched copper plate – made by using hard ground and the Edinburgh Etch solution.

As I am very much a novice print maker I learned a great deal at this class. I had been keen to learn this print method for 2 reasons. The first is that my drawings are very detailed, with very fine lines, and I wanted to reproduce that fine detail. I knew that etching would achieve that. The second is that I had read that Edinburgh Etch was a less toxic method that could be done at home.

My previous foray into etching used more hazardous chemicals and required a fume cupboard – I only did it once and decided that was not for me.

Preparing the etching plates

For the first lesson we prepared the plates – bevelled the edges, polished the surface, poured on the hard ground, waited for that to dry, and protected the back and edges. Then we drew into the hard ground, and placed the plate in the Edinburgh Etch solution for 45 minutes. Then the tape and hard ground were removed to reveal the bitten image.

This was my first print from my first etching plate prepared using Edinburgh Etch.

This was my first print from my first etching plate prepared using Edinburgh Etch.

Printing from the etched plates

The printing took place during the second lesson and I was very pleased with the result. Some of the other people in the class had a go at adding aquatint but I decided to keep it simple this time around. During this lesson we also prepared another plate so that we could draw into it at home ready for printing during lesson 3.

These lessons were aimed at beginners so we only used one colour. Shana talked about using more than one colour and registration, but what we did was quite enough for me to take in at this early stage. I also asked a lot of questions about the type of paper that is suitable for printing etchings. I need to do some homework on this to find out which papers I like best.

I know now that this method suits my style of work and will be practical for my home studio situation. I will be able to do the actual printing at the PAWA premises where they have a press for the use of members.

This is the first print from my second etching plate.

This is the first print from my second etching plate.

This is my second etched plate from the etching class with Shana James where we used Edinburgh Etch solution. July 2015.

This is my second etched plate from the etching class with Shana James where we used Edinburgh Etch solution. July 2015.

I left feeling inspired and with an extra plate to have another go at home. I’ve bought most of the things required – just a couple of bits and pieces left to find. I’ve read 5 library books about printing since the class and am part way through another!

 

Another disaster – felting this time

Artwork by Liz, Artwork Experiments, Uncategorized

Needle Felting the Bowl

I spent several hours creating two bowl shapes by randomly weaving over a plastic bowl with Courtelle machine knitting yarn. I planned to embroider different designs on the inside and the outside of both of them and then dry-felt with hand-held felting needles to integrate the wool stitching. This was easy to do but took quite a bit of time and I was quite pleased with the overall look.

Bowl randomly woven over a plastic bowl with Courtelle yarn. After embroidering over the weaving I used needle felting to finish - this weakened the structure.

Bowl randomly woven over a plastic bowl with Courtelle yarn. Embroidered with tapestry wool on the inside and outside and dry-felted. In places where there was no wool the needles weakened the courtelle to the point where it could be torn easily by hand.

Then I noticed there were some weak areas between some of the circles on the outside. When I pushed (hard) with my finger I was able to push through and pull the fabric apart at those points. I wasn’t able to pull it apart where there was wool on both the inside and the outside (ie the courtelle sandwiched between the 2 layers). I cannot tear the other unembroidered bowl so clearly it was the needle-felting that has broken down, or cut perhaps, the fibres of the Courtelle. I was unimpressed – it had taken me several hours to dry felt (leave alone the time taken to make the bowl shape in the first place) and in so doing I had destroyed something I quite liked the look of.

Lessons Learned

I have learned a lesson – I will only dry-felt with felting needles on wool. This was my first foray into dry-felting with needles and now I am wondering how strong some of the embroideries I have seen made with the embellishing machines are when they have used synthetic fabrics/yarns. I am going to put these in the bin – I don’t want to incorporate something I am not happy with into any other artworks. I am going to embroider the other bowl base as I am quite happy with the strength of that structure – but I will not be using felting needles on it because of the Courtelle base layer.