Collagraph Plate experiment – loom bands

Artwork by Liz, Artwork Experiments, Uncategorized

How I made the collagraph plate

To make the collagraph plate I sealed a piece of thick card with Atelier Regular Gloss Gel and used the gel to adhere some loom bands. A big tub of loom bands were bought for $1 in a reject shop (obviously not the “in thing” to do anymore). The bands were adhered to the card with the idea of using it to remove paint from the Gelli® plate and also as a collagraph plate in it’s own right.

Collagraph plate problems

Collagraph plate made from loom bands glued to thick card using Gel Medium. When I used Matisse Block Printing Ink the stickiness of the ink was strong enough to pull the bands off of the board. But there is an interesting texture left in the medium ?

Collagraph plate made from loom bands glued to thick card using Gel Medium. When I used Matisse Block Printing Ink the stickiness of the ink was strong enough to pull the bands off of the board. But there is an interesting texture left in the medium ?

The top half of the photo shows the state of the plate after only a few prints. The lower half shows (l to r) a previously printed sheet overprinted from the cardboard plate, a ghost print from the Gelli® plate, a print from the cardboard plate, a print from the Gelli® plate.

I had applied 3 coats of gel to adhere the bands. This time I decided to experiment with the Matisse Block Printing inks after the disaster with the Shellac/acrylic paint/open medium disaster. The block printing inks are much stickier than the paint mixture. So sticky in fact that they started to pull the loom bands off the gel medium! So this too has turned into a mini-disaster. It’s just not my week 🙁 I will try other glues to stick the loom bands down as I really like the effect of these slightly “off” circles. The block printing inks didn’t really cover very well on the Gelli® plate either so I got lines/patchiness and sometimes the roller picked the ink up again as I rolled. So I probably need to use some other base for mono-printing with the printing inks. The bands that have come off have left an imprint in the gel medium so maybe all is not lost – maybe I can take all the bands off and use the texture of the gel medium as a printing plate. I managed a few prints before the loom bands all started looking a bit loose.

2 thoughts on “Collagraph Plate experiment – loom bands

  1. Liz Please do yourself a big favour and go and get hold of “INTAGLIO” by Carol Robertson & Robert Adam (Thames and Hudson)

    It’s an excellent (up to date) printmaking book for all ‘intaglio’ techniques – which of course includes COLLAGRAPH. It would probably be best if you could get the book from your library at first.

    There is a chapter in the book about collagraph printmaking and it’s really inspiring and contains the basis under which I make a lot of my own prints. I glue things to the ‘plate’ using thick PVA ( i.e., not crafters watered down PVA) I apply wide shiny parcel tape (brown/beige color doesnt cost too much) to the back of the plates. Its cheap and quick. I sometimes pencil in my design first on the front of the mount-board (what I most often use to make ‘plates’). I like using this because I can cut it into shapes and can then interplay the plates shapes (or as I call them ‘elements’) into various different artworks/ configurations.

    Anyway to seal the plate I use Lascaux acrylic hard ground. It’s expensive BUT extremely good and very -very versatile. It’s self-leveling and dries quickly (20 mins). You can probably also get some other brand name acrylic hard ground products which for all I know , may be just as good. It really is best to keep all your plate products in the same ‘family’ so to speak (as in polymers). Do have a look at my blog to find stuff out and get ideas of things to try out. Whatever you do – DONT GIVE UP !!

    You are also welcome to drop me a line with any questions/ difficulties.

    best wishes with further endeavors

    Aine

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