Printing – and overprinting

Uncategorized

For my second attempt I took some of the prints from my first session and added a second layer. I’m not so keen on the multi-coloured patchwork effect which seems to be the predominant way to use the Gelli plate as I find them very busy in general. Some people seem to carry this off with aplomb but I’m sure my efforts will look more like “a bomb” (has gone off) than “aplomb”.

This print has too much contrast for my liking so I decided to try overprinting it.

This print has too much contrast for my liking so I decided to try overprinting it.

I want to see if I can produce simple, well-composed images within the confines of the Gelli plate with only a few pulls (say up to 5) which then need minimal “tweaking” to finalise them. I’m envisioning a few well-placed stitches, collaged paper scraps or brush strokes to accentuate focal points will be all that is required to complete them.

I see the patchwork happening when I cut up the less satisfying prints to create collages.

I created a printing plate from printing foam by pushing the blunt end of a skewer into it to create an all over dots pattern. I used this in 2 ways – to put ink (acrylic paint) onto the Gelli Plate – and as an indirect printing plate by taking paint off of the Gelli Plate.

I used a bamboo skewer to push holes into some polystyrene foam. The foam was used to remove paint from the printing plate. This print is from the printing plate. The print from the foam isn't shown.

I used a bamboo skewer to push holes into some polystyrene foam. The foam was used to remove paint from the printing plate. This print is from the printing plate. The print from the foam isn’t shown.

The second photo has no white because the ink was applied to the Gelli plate first and then the foam printing plate was used to remove paint from the Gelli plate. Where there is contact some paint is removed (giving a lighter colour) and where there is no contact the paint is unchanged (and therefore darker). A paper print pulled from this has no white showing.

This is a previous print which had a lot of contrast (very white circles on a dark blue background) overprinted with the ghost (second pull without adding more ink) image of another print

This is a previous print which had a lot of contrast (very white circles on a dark blue background) overprinted with the ghost (second pull without adding more ink) image of another print.

The third photo shows a previous print which had a lot of contrast (very white circles on a dark blue background) overprinted with the ghost (second pull without adding more ink) image of the print in the second photo.

The layering of images and the density of the ink will take me some time to master I think – my vision of “simple, well-composed images within the confines of the Gelli plate with only a few pulls (say up to 5) which then need minimal “tweaking” to finalise them” could be a long time coming 🙂

One thought on “Printing – and overprinting

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.